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PSU in the NFL

A Look at Every Penn Stater Who has Won At Least One Super Bowl

Photo by Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Chris Godwin

A Penn Stater has appeared in every Super Bowl (except for five since 1967). 

That will continue this Sunday when Grant Haley and Nick Scott of the Los Angeles Rams carry the flag for the Blue & White. While the world waits to see if Haley and Scott will get rings, here’s a look at past Penn State players who have.

*Note: Chris Hogan won’t be talked about here. He played Lacrosse at Penn State, not football.

Super Bowls I and II

DAVE ROBINSON, GREEN BAY PACKERS

Robinson’s name isn’t known to Penn Staters and Penn State fans as well as guys like Jack Ham, Franco Harris and LaVar Arrington are, but those who know their football history are aware of Robinson’s significance. 

In 10 seasons with the Packers, Robinson became an integral part of Vince Lombardi’s dynasty as a linebacker. 

Robinson pressured Don Meredith on the last play of the 1966 NFL Championship Game that forced the game-clinching interception that put the Packers in the first Super Bowl.

Robinson was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2013. 

Super Bowl III: Ralph Baker, New York Jets

Super Bowl VII and VIII: Bruce Bannon, Miami Dolphins 

Super Bowl IX, X, XIII and XIV: FRANCO HARRIS AND JACK HAM, PITTSBURGH STEELERS

Every Penn State fan knows these guys. Harris and Ham both played at Penn State in the late 60s and early 70s. Both were part of Joe Paterno’s second undefeated season in 1969. Both ended up as integral members of the Steelers dynasty of the 1970s, and both are in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. 

Harris scored the Steelers’ first touchdown of their first Super Bowl win over the Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl IX. Harris finished that game with 158 yards on 34 carries and was named MVP.

Ham’s best Super Bowl performance came in Super Bowl XIII when he had eight tackles to lead all players. 

Super Bowl XI 

TED KWALICK, DAVE ROW, OAKLAND RAIDERS

Kwalick was one of Paterno’s first stars, earning All-American honors in 1967 and ’68. He was no slouch in the NFL, either.

In nine seasons with the San Francisco 49ers and Oakland Raiders, Kwalick made the Pro Bowl every year from 1971-73. By 1976, Kwalick was in the twilight of his career and only caught four passes that entire season. His season ended after Week 9, and Kwalick wasn’t a part of any of Oakland’s three playoff wins.

Super Bowl XII: Tom Rafferty, Dallas Cowboys

Super Bowls XIV, XV, XVIII and XXV

MATT BAHR, PITTSBURGH STEELERS/NEW YORK GIANTS, CHRIS BAHR, OAKLAND/LOS ANGELES RAIDERS

The Bahr brothers are the only pair of Penn State siblings to win Super Bowls.

Matt Bahr started in all three postseason games for the Steelers, and in Super Bowl XIV against the Rams, he went 4-for-4 with an extra point in the 31-19 win. A decade later, Bahr made two fields goals– including the game-winner– and two extra points as the Giants beat the Buffalo Bills in the famous “wide right” game. 

Matt’s brother, Chris, missed a field goal in Super Bowl XV against the Eagles but made his other two field goals and went 3-for-3 in extra points. In Super Bowl XXIII against the Redskins, Chris Bahr went 5-for-5 in PAT’s and made a field goal. 

Super Bowl XV

MATT MILLEN, OAKLAND RAIDERS

Millen is known to younger football fans for his work as a color commentator and his unsuccessful run as president and CEO of the Detroit Lions. 

Before that, Millen was a star defensive tackle on Paterno’s late 70s Penn State powerhouses and wound up having a solid 12-year career in the pros, winning four Super Bowl rings on three teams. 

Super Bowl XVI Pat Kugler, San Francisco 49ers

Super Bowl XVII Larry Kubin, Rich Milot, Washington Redskins 

Super Bowl XVIII: Matt Millen, Chris Bahr, Jim Romano, Los Angeles Raiders

Super Bowl XX

MATT SUHEY, MIKE HARTENSTINE, CHICAGO BEARS 

Neither Suhey nor Hartenstine is one of the first, oh, 20 names one would say when rattling off members of perhaps the most famous football team of all time. 

Nonetheless, both of them have rings. Suhey is part of the “first family of Penn State football” that started with father Steve during World War II and has stretched to Matt’s son, Joe, who was a fullback for Penn State during Paterno’s final years. 

Suhey is probably best known for his friendship with Walter Payton in the NFL’s world. Hard to believe as it may be, Suhey scored a touchdown in the Bears’ 49-10 win over the New England Patriots. Payton did not. 

Super Bowl XXI: Brad Benson, New York Giants

Super Bowl XXII: Rich Milot, Washington Redskins

Super Bowl XXIII: Pete Kugler, San Francisco 49ers

Super Bowl XXIIV: Pete Kugler, Matt Millen, San Francisco 49ers

Super Bowl XXV: Bob Mrosko, New York Giants

Super Bowl XXVI: Andre Collins, Tim Johnson, Matt Millen, Washington Redskins 

Super Bowl XXXI

MARCO RIVERA, GREEN BAY PACKERS

Rivera was part of the offensive line that allowed Kerry Collins, Ki-Jana Carter, Bobby Engram and Kyle Brady to tear up college football in 1994. 

He played eight of his ten NFL seasons in Green Bay, making the Pro Bowl three times and twice being named All-Pro. 

Super Bowl XXXVI

KIM HERRING AND SAM GASH, BALTIMORE RAVENS

An All-American at Penn State in 1996, Herring became the first– and, still, the only– former Nittany Lion to intercept a pass in the Super Bowl. The man he intercepted? Another Penn Stater, New York Giants quarterback Kerry Collins. 

Herring played nine seasons in the NFL with the Ravens, Rams and Bengals. Additionally, Gash played 13 seasons in the league and made two all-pro teams as a fullback. 

Super Bowl XXXVII

JOE JEREVICIUS, TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS 

Jurevicius played in three Super Bowls, losing two of them with the Rams and Seahawks, respectively. He finally got his ring against the Oakland Raiders in Super Bowl XXXVII. Jurevicius caught four passes for 78 yards in Tampa’s 48-21 win. 

He ended up playing 11 seasons in the league. 

Super Bowl XXVIII: Shawn Mayer, New England Patriots

Super Bowl XXXIX: Justin Kerpeikis, New England Patriots 

Super Bowl XL

JEFF HARTINGS, PITTSBURGH STEELERS

Penn State’s ’94 center had to wait 10 seasons to get to the Super Bowl. He finally got there in February of 2006, and his Steelers got the job done, beating the Seattle Seahawks 21-10 to get the elusive “one for the thumb.” Two of Hartings’ teammates, Jerevicius and Bobby Engram, were on the losing side of Super Bowl XL.

Super Bowl XLII: Jay Alford, Kareem McKenzie, New York Giants

Super Bowl XLIII: Sean McHugh, Scott Paxson, Pittsburgh Steelers

Super Bowl XLV: Andrew Quarless, Green Bay Packers

Super Bowl XLVI: Jimmy Kennedy, Kareem McKenzie, New York Giants

Super Bowl XLVIII

MICHAEL ROBINSON, JORDAN HILL, SEATTLE SEAHAWKS 

What Burton Michael Robinson did for Penn State football in 2005 won’t be forgotten by Nittany Lion fans any time soon. He didn’t have a shabby pro career, either.

Moving from quarterback to fullback, Robinson carved out eight NFL seasons– the last four in Seattle– making it to the Pro Bowl in 2011.

The Super Bowl win over the Broncos turned out to be Robinson’s last NFL game. What a way to go out. 

Super Bowl 50: Jordan Norwood, Denver Broncos

Super Bowl LII

STEFEN WISNIEWSKI, PHILADELPHIA EAGLES 

Wisniewski’s father, Leo, played at Penn State in the late 70s and early 80s. His uncle, Steve, was a two-time All-American at Penn State in the late 80s and ended up having an excellent 13-year pro career with the Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders, making eight Pro Bowls and eight All-Pro teams. 

Stefen was also an All-American at Penn State, and although he didn’t match Uncle Steve’s success in the NFL, he’s the only one in his family with a Super Bowl ring, and he has two, with the Eagles and Chiefs.

Wisniewski retired this past August after 11 seasons.

Super Bowl LIV: Stefen Wisniewski, Jordan Lucas, Kansas City Chiefs

Super Bowl LV

CHRIS GODWIN, DONOVAN SMITH, A.Q. SHIPLEY, TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS 

Both Godwin and Smith started on James Franklin’s first Penn State team in 2014, and both started on Tom Brady’s last Super Bowl team in 2020.

Godwin only caught two passes for nine yards in the big game but had a massive role in getting the Bucs there. Smith started the game at tackle, and Shipley, the pride of Moon Township, ended his playing career on top.

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